What to read in February?

Another cold month of February is coming and this is the best time for a cozy blanket and a cup of hot chocolate. We have selected 5 best novels of different genres — read and enjoy. 

Americanah  by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Top Best Books to ReadIfemelu and Obinze fell in love with each other at school and could not  continue to live apart. However, fate decreed otherwise:  Ifemelu went to America, where she has established a relatively good life. She studies and updates a popular blog about racism and whereas, Obinze is forced to be an illegal immigrant in London.

As one of the critics briefly wrote about this novel, ” A black woman comes to America and finds out that she is black.”

“If you don’t understand, ask questions. If you’re uncomfortable about asking questions, say you are uncomfortable about asking questions and then ask anyway. It’s easy to tell when a question is coming from a good place. Then listen some more. Sometimes people just want to feel heard. Here’s to possibilities of friendship and connection and understanding.” 
― Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Americanah

 

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng

Top Best Books to readA small cozy town Shaker Heights, where everything is respectable, correctly and accurately planned for many years. One day,  photographer Mia arrives in the city with her daughter and the orderly life of the city was disrupted. It turns out that you can sleep in the car, break up temporary earnings and take the side of an Asian waitress who has given up the child’s poverty and despair and is now trying to get the baby back by taking it away from a rich family.

“Sometimes you need to scorch everything to the ground, and start over. After the burning the soil is richer, and new things can grow. People are like that, too. They start over. They find a way.”
― Celeste Ng, Little Fires Everywhere

 

Stillhouse Lake by Rachel Caine (Stillhouse Lake #1)

Top Best books

What if your husband is a serial killer? Gina Royal was the perfect wife: a strong marriage, two children, a cozy home – the usual American family. Until one ordinary day, when suddenly opens, who is her husband and what  happens in their garage.

So, Gina took the children, changed the name and moves from place to place, in search of silence. But as soon as she began to feel calm in her new life, the body was found in the lake—and letters with threats begin to arrive from a too familiar address.

“Normal life. Comfortable life. Not perfect, of course. Nobody had a perfect marriage, did they?”
― Rachel Caine, Stillhouse Lake

 

The Interestings by Meg Wolitzer

What to read in February?1974, a group of teenagers met in the art camp, unaware that this meeting will be the beginning of many years of friendship. They are waiting for the road from youth to maturity, from dreams to practicality, but the friendship will only grow stronger. This is a story about the nature of talent, envy, money and power. And how easy it all changes during life.

An exciting novel about what to do if a brilliant and gifted person is not you. The story of a long friendship in which some friends are more talented than others. Reading this novel, you understand how subjective someone else’s uniqueness and that your little life can also seem like a dream to someone.

“What does a woman have to do to be seen as a serious person?”
“Be a man, I guess,” Ethan said…” 
― Meg Wolitzer, The Interestings

 

Behind Closed Doors by B.A. Paris

Top Best BooksJack and grace’s marriage seems perfect. Jack is the best lawyer in town. Grace is a happy housewife, she cooks well and skillfully takes care of the garden. It seems that their lives have everything you can dream of. But what happens at home when the front door closes behind the last guest?

“Stunned, I sat down on the bed, reading the message over and over again, convinced I had misunderstood it in some way. I couldn’t believe that Jack would have written something so cruel or been so cutting. He had never spoken to me in such a way before, he had never even raised his voice to me. I felt as if I’d been slapped in the face. Surely I deserved some explanation and, at the very least, an apology? I needed to talk to someone, badly, so it was sobering to realise there was no one I could call. My parents and I didn’t have the sort of relationship that would allow me to sob down the phone that he had left me by myself and for some reason I felt too ashamed to tell any of my friends. Where had the perfect gentleman I’d thought him to be gone? Had it all been a facade, had he covered his true self with a cloak of geniality and good humour to impress me?”
― B.A. Paris, Behind Closed Doors

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